Recent Posts

How Mold Can Impact Your Health

6/18/2019 (Permalink)

Mold Remediation How Mold Can Impact Your Health Hidden mold can have a negative impact on your health

Chronic inflammatory response syndrome (CIRS) is a serious, multi-symptom illness that negatively impacts more than one system in the body. Most often is it caused by exposure to harmful biotoxins or neurotoxins in our environment. These toxins may be caused by:

  • Mold in the home.
  • Pfiesteria – Microscopic organism that produces toxins known to cause large fish kills.
  • Cyanobacteria – Commonly found in lakes and rivers.
  • Lyme disease – Transmitted by tick bites.
  • Poisonous spider bites.
  • Ciguatera – A toxin affecting reef fish that are often consumed by humans.

The effects of this inflammatory syndrome vary depending on the person and their experience. However, the respiratory, neurological, psychological, and gastrointestinal symptoms can be life-changing, no matter the source, which is why it is essential to know the signs and see your doctor if you think you have it. Remember, mold allergies are not the same as mold illness, so it is critical to determine the reason for your symptoms. If you recently had flooding in your home or the interior of your household has been humid, you will also want to determine if your symptoms of CIRS are being caused by exposure to mold in your home.

Characteristics of CIRS From Mold Exposure

It is important to know that the effects of chronic inflammatory response syndrome from mold exposure will present itself differently than if it was caused by something else, such as a spider bite, a burn or lyme disease. In fact, when a person develops this syndrome due to mold exposure specifically, they will usually experience some of these symptoms, in addition to those mentioned above: 

  • Headache
  • Sinus congestion
  • Sore throat
  • Nosebleeds 
  • Itchy eyes 
  • Cough 
  • Flu symptoms 
  • Wheezing
  • Stomach ache 

These symptoms are also typical signs of illnesses like influenza, indoor and outdoor allergies, and the common cold, so it is important to see your physician if you have them. 

Checking Your Home for Signs of Mold

No matter the cause, chronic inflammatory response syndrome is a severe illness with lasting consequences. In many cases, it does develop as a result of toxic mold exposure, which is why it is important to have your Lynn, Lynnfield or Nahant home checked if you or your doctor think mold may be causing your symptoms. A professional mold inspection completed by an experienced technician will determine if mold is present, and they will let you know what needs to be done to safely remove it. 

SERVPRO of Lynn/Lynnfield is staffed with experienced experts that come to your home for a mold consultation.   Call us today at 781.593.6663

The 5 Most Common Sources of Water Damage in your Home

6/18/2019 (Permalink)

Water Damage The 5 Most Common Sources of Water Damage in your Home Check these 5 sources to prevent water damage in your home

As a homeowner, you need to be aware of all the possible things to protect your home against. Storm damage, earthquake damage, wind damage – and, most frequent of all, water damage. We don’t like to think of our homes being ravaged by the elements, but it happens, and when it does, we need to be prepared. Instead of being reactive, we can try taking proactive steps to safeguard our homes and protect our belongings (plus save a bunch on costs). Below, we outline the five most common causes of water damage in your home in the hopes that this information will help you avoid damage to your home.

1. Air Conditioner

Your air conditioner might seem to be working just fine, but it’s important to adhere to regular service dates (at least once each year) to ensure nothing is malfunctioning behind the scenes. Your A/C removes moisture from the air, and sometimes that moisture builds up within the A/C itself. If not properly drained, that water could be slowly leaking into your home – potentially ruining the flooring and drywall and, in many cases, introducing mold.

2. Dishwasher

Dishwashers are another possible culprit of water damage in your home. Your dishwasher can cause water damage if not properly sealed, meaning that the latch is broken, or if it was loaded with the wrong soap. Make sure that any leaks are immediately addressed and that your dishwasher is repaired or replaced ASAP, so you can avoid costly water damage repairs to your kitchen.

3. Washing Machine

Perform regular checks on your washing machine, inspecting beneath the unit as well as behind it. Make sure all fittings are securely connected, and that the underbelly of the washing machine isn’t leaking any water beneath the unit. If you have an older washing machine that gives you frequent issues, consider replacing it altogether.

4. Leaking Pipes

It might seem obvious, but water damage in the home is often caused by leaky pipes. Let’s pretend that you have a loose-fitting pipe under the kitchen sink or in the bathroom, and you’ve just recently noticed water pooling in that area. Don’t wait to call a plumber – a leak in one place in your home could signify leaks in other areas, too. If you notice spikes in your water bill, a leak is likely present and needs to be addressed before additional damage is caused to your landscaping, foundation, flooring, or other areas of the home.

5. Clogged Drains

Clogged drains aren’t just annoying, they also cause water damage (and mold growth) if left unchecked. If your toilet is clogged, it means that not only can you not use the toilet, but you will likely also experience water backing up into the shower, sinks, or bathroom floor. Sewer water is extremely dangerous because it contains raw sewage and bacteria, and must be cleaned up by a professional. If your kitchen sink drain is backing up, you can experience sink overflow and subsequent damages to your kitchen flooring and cabinetry. Make sure to seek professional help when experiencing frequent drain clogs so you don’t have to deal with water damage to your home on top of the clog itself.

So there you have it: the top five causes of interior water damage. By knowing the most common causes of home water damage, you’ll be able to take preventative steps to avoid them. 

But what if it’s too late for prevention? The team at SERVPRO of Lynn/Lynnfield offers service throughout the North Shore area, so you’ll always be in good hands.   Call us today at 781.593.6663

Turn Down the Temp, But Don't Let Your Pipes Freeze!

1/18/2019 (Permalink)

You often hear about how you should turn down the thermostat to save energy, and there are a slew of helpful ideas on the subject.  You can turn the thermostat down when you're out, when you're sleeping, and you can save about 1% on your energy bill per degree you turn your thermostat down! This is all very exciting.

But before you go crazy with turning down the thermostat really low, I'd like to point out some things you might want to keep in mind.

Frozen pipes are a big deal. If the water in your pipes starts freezing, you run the risk of that pipe exploding—and goodness knows that's not what most people are hoping to do when they're trying to save energy in the dead of winter. Unfortunately, I can't just say "keep your thermostat over X degrees to avoid pipe freezing." It depends on where you live, where your pipes are, and how well insulated those pipes are.

There are relatively few places in the United States where you'd never have to worry about frozen pipes. According to Weather.com, southern states generally start having issues with frozen pipes when the temperature reaches about 20 degrees Fahrenheit (the distinction is made because houses in the south are less likely to build pipes inside or in the "warm" parts of your home.)

So, unless you live in a place where it never gets below freezing (you lucky souls, you), you'll need to know some things about your house or apartment: Some water pipes will be in the "warm" parts of your house.

This is why you don't want the temperature inside your house to drop too low, because bathroom and kitchen pipes are generally not insulated, and they rely on whatever system you're using to heat the rest of your house to keep warm.

And if you rent, you might want to see if the owners require their tenants to keep their thermostat above a certain level—my apartment requires all tenants to keep their thermostats above 65, for example, and asks us to consider leaving the taps dripping.

But while these are all good reasons to be careful with the temperature you keep your thermostat at, don't forget the rest of your pipes—some of your water pipes may be in "cold" parts of your house, like crawl spaces or attics, where they don't get any of your home's ambient heat and may, in fact, be subjected to air directly from the outside.

What you'll need to do is based on the region you live in, so you may want to look up your state or city's Web site and see if they have recommendations on how to prepare your house for the winter, because you may want to insulate those pipes.

In the end, I suppose it's still a judgment call, but just remember: Your pipes are vulnerable, frozen pipes are a pain, and you should always consider how your house is built before you make any drastic decisions on how to heat your home in the winter.

https://www.energy.gov/energysaver/articles/turn-down-temp-dont-let-your-pipes-freeze

Thanksgiving Fire Safety- Everything You Need to Know

11/12/2018 (Permalink)

For most, the kitchen is the heart of the home, especially during the holidays. From testing family recipes to decorating cakes and cookies, everyone enjoys being part of the preparations.

So keeping fire safety top of mind in the kitchen during this joyous but hectic time is important, especially when there’s a lot of activity and people at home. As you start preparing your holiday schedule and organizing that large family feast, remember, by following a few simple safety tips you can enjoy time with your loved ones and keep yourself and your family safer from fire.

Thanksgiving by the numbers

  • Thanksgiving is the peak day for home cooking fires, followed by the day before Thanksgiving and Christmas Day. and Christmas Eve.
  • In 2015, U.S. fire departments responded to an estimated 1,760 home cooking fires on Thanksgiving, the peak day for such fires.
  • Unattended cooking was by far the leading contributing factor in cooking fires and fire deaths.
  • Cooking equipment was involved in almost half of all reported home fires and home fire injuries, and it is the second leading cause of home fire deaths.  

Safety tips

  • Stay in the kitchen when you are cooking on the stovetop so you can keep an eye on the food.
  • Stay in the home when cooking your turkey and check on it frequently.
  • Keep children away from the stove. The stove will be hot and kids should stay 3 feet away.
  • Make sure kids stay away from hot food and liquids. The steam or splash from vegetables, gravy or coffee could cause serious burns.
  • Keep the floor clear so you don’t trip over kids, toys, pocketbooks or bags.
  • Keep knives out of the reach of children.
  • Be sure electric cords from an electric knife, coffee maker, plate warmer or mixer are not dangling off the counter within easy reach of a child.
  • Keep matches and utility lighters out of the reach of children — up high in a locked cabinet.
  • Never leave children alone in room with a lit candle.
  • Make sure your smoke alarms are working. Test them by pushing the test button.

https://www.nfpa.org/Public-Education/By-topic/Seasonal-fires/Thanksgiving-safety

October Is National Fire Prevention Month

10/12/2018 (Permalink)

Home Safety Checklist

Smoke Alarms

There is one smoke alarm on every level of the home and inside and outside each sleeping area.

Smoke alarms are tested and cleaned monthly.

Smoke alarm batteries are changed as needed. 

Smoke alarms are less than 10 years old.

Cooking Safety

Cooking area is free from items that can catch fire.

Kitchen stove hood is clean and vented to the outside.

Pots are not left unattended on the stove.

Electrical & Appliance Safety

Electrical cords do not run under rugs.

Electrical cords are not frayed or cracked.

Circuit-protected, multi-prong adapters are used for additional outlets.

Large and small appliances are plugged directly into wall outlets.

Clothes dryer lint filter and venting system are clean.

Candle Safety

Candles are in sturdy fire-proof containers that won’t be tipped over.

All candles are extinguished before going to bed or leaving the room.

Children and pets are never left unattended with candles.

Carbon Monoxide Alarms

Carbon monoxide alarms are located on each level of the home.

Carbon monoxide alarms are less than 7 years old.

Smoking Safety

Family members who smoke only buy fire-safe cigarettes and smoke outside.

Matches and lighters are secured out of children’s sight.

Ashtrays are large, deep and kept away from items that can catch fire.

Ashtrays are emptied into a container that will not burn.

Heating Safety

Chimney and furnace are cleaned and inspected yearly.

Furniture and other items that can catch fire are at least 3 feet from fireplaces, wall heaters,   baseboards, and space heaters.

Fireplace and barbecue ashes are placed outdoors in a covered metal container at least 3 feet from   anything that can catch fire.

Extension cords are never used with space heaters.

Heaters are approved by a national testing laboratory and have tip-over shut-off function.

Home Escape Plan

Have two ways out of each room.

Know to crawl low to the floor when escaping to avoid toxic smoke.

Know that once you’re out, stay out. 

Know where to meet after the escape.

Meeting place should be near the front of your home, so firefighters know you are out.

Practice your fire escape plan.

16 Pumpkin Facts That'll Make You Say "Oh My Gourd"

10/12/2018 (Permalink)

  1. The word "pumpkin" showed up for the first time in the fairy tale Cinderella.

A French explorer in 1584 first called them "gros melons," which was translated into English as "pompions," according to history. It wasn't until the 17th century that they were first referred to as pumpkins.

  1. The original jack-o'-lanterns were made withturnips and potatoes by the Irish.

In England, they used large beets and lit them with embers to ward off evil spirits. Irish immigrants brought their customs to America, but found that pumpkins were much easier to carve.

  1. Pumpkins are grown on every continent except Antarctica.

Which makes quite a bit of sense considering, oh you know, Antarctica is a 24/7 icy tundra.

  1. Over 1.5 billion pounds of pumpkin are produced each year in the United States.

The top pumpkin producing states are Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and California.

  1. Morton, Illinois, calls itself the "Pumpkin Capital of the World"

According to the University of Illinois, 95% of the pumpkins grown in the U.S. are harvested in Illinois soil. Morton is allegedly responsible for 80% of the world's canned pumpkin production.

  1. 80% of the U.S.'s pumpkin crop is available during October.

Out of the total 1.5 billion pounds, over 800 million pumpkins are ripe for the picking in a single month of the year.

  1. The world's heaviest pumpkin weighed over 2,600 pounds.

It was grown in Germany and presented in October 2016.

  1. The largest pumpkin pie ever baked weighed 3,699 pounds.

Pumpkin pie originated in the colonies, just not as we know it today. Colonists would cut the tops of pumpkins off, remove the seeds, fill the pumpkins with milk, spices, and honey, then bake them in hot ashes.

  1. Pumpkin-flavored sales totaled over $414 million in 2017.

But people are starting to opt for fresh pumpkin instead, according to Nielsen Retail Measurement Services.  Some pumpkin-flavored products have seen consistent growth over recent years, including cereal, coffee, and even dog food.

  1. Each pumpkin has about 500 seeds.

They take between 90 and 120 days to grow, which is why it's recommended to plant them between May and July.  High in iron, they can be roasted to eat. The flowers that grow on pumpkin vines are also edible.

  1. Delaware used to host an annual "Punkin Chunkin"   championship.

Teams competed in a pumpkin launching competition, where pumpkins were shot almost 5,000 feet from an air cannon. The event was canceled in 2017 after there was a tragic accident the year before.

  1. There are more than 45 different varieties of pumpkin.

They range in color like red, yellow, and green, and have names like Hooligan, Cotton Candy, and Orange Smoothie.

  1. Pumpkins are technically
    1. fruit.

    More specifically, they are a winter squash in the family Cucurbitacae, which includes cucumbers and melons. But because they're savory, many people just call them vegetables anyway.

  1. Every single part of a pumpkin is edible.

Yep, you can eat the skin, leaves, flowers, pulp, seeds, and even the stem!

  1. Pumpkins are 90% water, which makes them a low-calorie food.

One cup of canned pumpkin has less than 100 calories and only half a gram of fat. In comparison, the same serving size of sweet potato has triple the calories. They also have more fiber than kale, more potassium than bananas, and are full of heart-healthy magnesium and iron.

  1. Surprisingly, pumpkin pie isn't America's favorite.

According to a survey by the American Pie Council, it's apple that takes the cake (um, pie?) — 19% of Americans say it's their pie of choice. Pumpkin is in second place with a respectable 13%.

https://www.goodhousekeeping.com/health/diet-nutrition/a22544/facts-about-pumpkins/

DISASTER PREPAREDNESS FOR OUR FURRY FRIENDS

9/18/2018 (Permalink)

Emergencies come in many forms, and they may require anything from a brief absence from your home to permanent evacuation. Each type of disaster requires different measures to keep your pets safe, so the best thing you can do for yourself and your pets is to be prepared. Here are simple steps you can follow now to make sure you’re ready before the next disaster strikes:

Step 1: Get a Rescue Alert Sticker

This easy-to-use sticker will let people know that pets are inside your home. Make sure it is visible to rescue workers (we recommend placing it on or near your front door), and that it includes the types and number of pets in your home as well as the name and number of your veterinarian. If you must evacuate with your pets, and if time allows, write “EVACUATED” across the stickers. To get a free emergency pet alert sticker for your home, please fill out our online order form and allow 6-8 weeks for delivery. 

Step 2: Arrange a Safe Haven

Arrange a safe haven for your pets in the event of evacuation. DO NOT LEAVE YOUR PETS BEHIND. Remember, if it isn’t safe for you, it isn’t safe for your pets. They may become trapped or escape and be exposed to numerous life-threatening hazards. Note that not all shelters accept pets, so it is imperative that you have determined where you will bring your pets ahead of time:

  • Contact your veterinarian for a list of preferred boarding kennels and facilities.
  • Ask your local animal shelter if they provide emergency shelter or foster care for pets.
  • Identify hotels or motels outside of your immediate area that accept pets.
  • Ask friends and relatives outside your immediate area if they would be willing to take in your pet.

Step 3: Choose "Designated Caregivers”

This step will take considerable time and thought. When choosing a temporary caregiver, consider someone who lives close to your residence. He or she should be someone who is generally home during the day while you are at work or has easy access to your home. A set of keys should be given to this trusted individual. This may work well with neighbors who have pets of their own—you may even swap responsibilities, depending upon who has accessibility.

When selecting a permanent caregiver, you’ll need to consider other criteria. This is a person to whom you are entrusting the care of your pet in the event that something should happen to you. When selecting this “foster parent,” consider people who have met your pet and have successful cared for animals in the past. Be sure to discuss your expectations at length with a permanent caregiver, so he or she understands the responsibility of caring for your pet.

Step 4: Prepare Emergency Supplies and Traveling Kits

If you must evacuate your home in a crisis, plan for the worst-case scenario. Even if you think you may be gone for only a day, assume that you may not be allowed to return for several weeks. When recommendations for evacuation have been announced, follow the instructions of local and state officials. To minimize evacuation time, take these simple steps:

  • Make sure all pets wear collars and tags with up-to-date identification information. Your pet’s ID tag should contain his name, telephone number and any urgent medical needs. Be sure to also write your pet’s name, your name and contact information on your pet’s carrier.
  • The ASPCA recommends microchipping your pet as a more permanent form of identification. A microchip is implanted under the skin in the animal’s shoulder area, and can be read by a scanner at most animal shelters.
  • Always bring pets indoors at the first sign or warning of a storm or disaster. Pets can become disoriented and wander away from home in a crisis.
  • Store an emergency kit and leashes as close to an exit as possible. Make sure that everyone in the family knows where it is, and that it clearly labeled and easy to carry. Items to consider keeping in or near your “Evac-Pack” include:
    • Pet first-aid kit and guide book (ask your vet what to include)
    • 3-7 days’ worth of canned (pop-top) or dry food (be sure to rotate every two months)
    • Disposable litter trays (aluminum roasting pans are perfect)
    • Litter or paper toweling
    • Liquid dish soap and disinfectant
    • Disposable garbage bags for clean-up
    • Pet feeding dishes and water bowls
    • Extra collar or harness as well as an extra leash
    • Photocopies and/or USB of medical records and a waterproof container with a two-week supply of any medicine your pet requires (Remember, food and medications need to be rotated out of your emergency kit—otherwise they may go bad or become useless)
    • At least seven days’ worth of bottled water for each person and pet (store in a cool, dry place and replace every two months)
    • A traveling bag, crate or sturdy carrier, ideally one for each pet
    • Flashlight
    • Blanket
    • Recent photos of your pets (in case you are separated and need to make “Lost” posters)
    • Especially for cats: Pillowcase, toys, scoop-able litter
    • Especially for dogs: Extra leash, toys and chew toys, a week’s worth of cage liner

You should also have an emergency kit for the human members of the family. Items to include: Batteries, duct tape, flashlight, radio, multi-tool, tarp, rope, permanent marker, spray paint, baby wipes, protective clothing and footwear, extra cash, rescue whistle, important phone numbers, extra medication and copies of medical and insurance information.

Step 5: Keep the ASPCA On-Hand at All Times

Help protect pets by spreading the word about disaster preparedness. Download, print and share FEMA’s brochure today. 

The free ASPCA mobile app shows pet parents exactly what to do in case of a natural disaster. It also allows pet owners to store vital medical records and provides information on making life-saving decisions during natural disasters.

How A/C Can Prevent Mold Growth in Humid Climates

8/7/2018 (Permalink)

HOW A/C CAN PREVENT MOLD GROWTH IN HUMID CLIMATES

The temperature in your home can affect you and your family’s comfort level tremendously, especially if you live in states with hot, humid summers like Massachusetts where we’ve been experiencing heat and humidity for most of July and August.  However, living in such climates could have other consequences for your home and family, as humidity can contribute to mold growth. Fortunately, your air conditioner can prevent the growth of this fungus, while also keeping you cool.

HOW TEMPERATURES AND HUMIDITY CONTRIBUTE TO MOLD GROWTH

Mold needs certain conditions to grow, and unfortunately for those who live in hot and humid places like Massachusetts in the summer, the heat plus the humidity create a moist environment where mold and dust mites thrive. While the various types of mold have different optimum conditions for growth many kinds of mold will grow well when conditions are between 60F and 80F - the same temperature range we’re often comfortable in. Combine these temperatures with excessive moisture and you could have a mold problem in your home.

HOW AIR CONDITIONING CAN PREVENT MOLD GROWTH

Your air conditioner can control the temperature and humidity in your home, which can prevent mold growth. During the hot, humid summer months, set your air conditioner to between 68 and 72 degrees Fahrenheit. The relative humidity in your house should not exceed 50 percent. While most modern air conditioners dehumidify as they cool, they do not independently control both temperature and humidity, so you may want to purchase a stand-alone dehumidifier for when conditions are especially humid.

Other tips for using your air conditioner to prevent mold include setting your air conditioners fan mode to auto because setting it to “on” can cause moisture produced during the air conditioning process to be blown back into your home.

Air Conditioner Maintenance

7/27/2018 (Permalink)

With the past two weeks of high heat and high humidity in the Northeast, air conditioners have been working overtime.  Let’s take a look at keeping them in tip top condition!

An air conditioner's filters, coils, and fins require regular maintenance for the unit to function effectively and efficiently throughout its years of service. Neglecting necessary maintenance ensures a steady decline in air conditioning performance while energy use steadily increases.

Air Conditioner Filters

The most important maintenance task that will ensure the efficiency of your air conditioner is to routinely replace or clean its filters. Clogged, dirty filters block normal airflow and reduce a system's efficiency significantly. With normal airflow obstructed, air that bypasses the filter may carry dirt directly into the evaporator coil and impair the coil's heat-absorbing capacity. Replacing a dirty, clogged filter with a clean one can lower your air conditioner's energy consumption by 5% to 15%.

For central air conditioners, filters are generally located somewhere along the return duct's length. Common filter locations are in walls, ceilings, furnaces, or in the air conditioner itself. Room air conditioners have a filter mounted in the grill that faces into the room.

Some types of filters are reusable; others must be replaced. They are available in a variety of types and efficiencies. Clean or replace your air conditioning system's filter or filters every month or two during the cooling season. Filters may need more frequent attention if the air conditioner is in constant use, is subjected to dusty conditions, or you have fur-bearing pets in the house.

Air Conditioner Coils

The air conditioner's evaporator coil and condenser coil collect dirt over their months and years of service. A clean filter prevents the evaporator coil from soiling quickly. In time, however, the evaporator coil will still collect dirt. This dirt reduces airflow and insulates the coil, reducing its ability to absorb heat. To avoid this problem, check your evaporator coil every year and clean it as necessary.

Outdoor condenser coils can also become very dirty if the outdoor environment is dusty or if there is foliage nearby. You can easily see the condenser coil and notice if dirt is collecting on its fins.

You should minimize dirt and debris near the condenser unit. Your dryer vents, falling leaves, and lawn mower are all potential sources of dirt and debris. Cleaning the area around the coil, removing any debris, and trimming foliage back at least 2 feet (0.6 meters) allow for adequate airflow around the condenser.

Coil Fins

The aluminum fins on evaporator and condenser coils are easily bent and can block airflow through the coil. Air conditioning wholesalers sell a tool called a "fin comb" that will comb these fins back into nearly original condition.

Condensate Drains

Occasionally pass a stiff wire through the unit's drain channels. Clogged drain channels prevent a unit from reducing humidity, and the resulting excess moisture may discolor walls or carpet.

Window Seals for Room Air Conditioners

At the start of each cooling season, inspect the seal between the air conditioner and the window frame to ensure it makes contact with the unit's metal case. Moisture can damage this seal, allowing cool air to escape from your house.

Preparing for Winter

In the winter, either cover your room air conditioner or remove and store it. Covering the outdoor unit of a central air conditioner will protect the unit from winter weather and debris.

https://www.energy.gov/energysaver/maintaining-your-air-conditioner

Commercial Mold Remediation

6/29/2018 (Permalink)

Mold Remediation Commercial Mold Remediation Mold in Basement of Commercial Building

Besides causing a major business interruption, a mold problem can present a serious health risk for people exposed at your commercial property. Mold infestations can be caused by minor water intrusions, like a slow roof leak or loose plumbing fitting. Every hour spent cleaning up is an hour of lost revenue and productivity. If you suspect your property has a mold problem, call SERVPRO of Lynn/Lynnfield, who will respond quickly and work fast to manage the situation.

  • 24 Hour Emergency Service
  • Faster to Any Size Disaster
  • A Trusted Leader in the Mold and Water Restoration Industry with over 1,700 Franchises
  • Highly Trained Mold and Water Damage Restoration Specialists

Have a Mold Problem?

Call Us Today – 781-593-6663

Commercial Mold Remediation Presents Unique Challenges

Mold can spread quickly through a property if left untreated. SERVPRO of Lynn/Lynnfield can respond quickly, working to first contain the infestation to help prevent its spread to other parts of the building. Next, we will begin the remediation process, working safely and effectively to manage the situation. We have the training, experience, and equipment to contain the mold infestation and remediate it to preloss condition.

Learn more about SERVPRO of Lynn/Lynnfield’s training and certifications.

  • Applied Microbial Remediation Specialist
  • Water Damage Restoration Technician
  • Applied Structural Drying Technician
  • Odor Control Technician
  • Upholstery and Fabric Cleaning Technician

If You See Signs of Mold, Call Us Today – 781-593-6663